The Magick and Power of Futhark

Raido, R Uruz, U Nauthiz, N Ehwaz, E Sowelu, S



Magickal Tools

Attire-Wand-Knife-Carver-Coloring Tools-Magickal Space-Magickal Timing-Other Tools
Chart of Correspondences




Preliminary Exercises-The Gods' Runes-The Oracle of The Self
Bind Runes-Numerical Symbolism-Color Symbolism
Transliteration of Modern English into Runes-Making a Talisman
Signing and Sending of Runes-Sign Magick
Spells and Rituals-Invocation
Meditations-Stadhagaldr-Elements-Runic Streams-Intake of World and Earth Streams-Divination
Definitions of Terms-Books About Runes



Attire

In the practice of rune craft the ceremonial clothing,
while important, do not play a central role in the cultic
symbolism. The vestments are roughly like those of the everyday
dress of an early medieval Northman, with special symbolic features.
The main advantage of magickal clothing is the effect it has of separating
one from their everyday life that putting on and wearing of the clothing should have.


The ideal attire for runecrafting is bright red pants,
black or natural-color heelless leather shoes, if you must,
but preferably no shoes (especially if outdoors), a white, red,
or blue pullover tunic with a loose fit, a belt made of leather or
deerskin to girdle the tunic, a sheath for your athame and a pouch to
hold other various magickal items may be attached to the belt, and a
hooded cloak of deep blue or black. The runes themselves can be
represented in two places among your ensemble: by adding a white
headband with bright red embroidered images and by the wearing of
bracteates, made of bronze, silver, or gold, upon which the Runes and
other magickal symbols are engraved (a very powerful addition to your attire).
The bracteates should be designed, created, and consecrated in accordance with the
magician's level of skill and knowledge.

Male and female magicians usually dress very much alike, except that
the females usually go barelegged or wear a long red skirt. Ritual nudity
is also practiced, according to the purpose of the ritual being performed.
In this, as in all matters of magick, the magician should allow intuition to be the guide.

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Galdr (Wand)

Galdr is the most generic term for magick wand in the technical language
of Runic Magick, but it is adequately expressive of this talisman’s powerful nature.


Your wand may be made out of any of a variety of woods (see the
Chart of Correspondences for some ideas).
No matter which wood you choose the following guidelines are to be followed in constructing your wand:
1. The diameter of the wand should be no smaller than your index finger and no larger
than the circle formed when you touch the tip of your index finger to the tip of your thumb.
2. The wand should be no shorter than the length of you hand and no longer than
the distance from your elbow to the tip of you middle finger.
3. The handle of the wand should be blunt or rounded and the tip should be fairly
pointed or just noticeably more rounded than the handle.
4. The wand should then be inscribed with runes.
As the magician you may choose an inscription that is
unique and personally empowering, or you may settle on one
of the following ideas:
A. Carve all 24 Runes into the wand in accordance with the ættir.
B. Carve all 24 of the Runes into the wand in accordance with your knowledge,
in the order in which you became familiar and comfortable with them as individuals.
C. Carve a numerically symbolic phrase, expression,
or mantra that uses 24 Runes altogether.


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Knife

The magician's knife is often used to carve Runes, but it is also used to cut
and prepare wood for making other talismans and in ritual defense and invocation.


The hilt of the knife should be made from wood or bone, and the blade
should be of the "sax" style, such as this one made by Jonathan A. Loose:


(Click on the photo to see more of Jonathan's incredible handmade blades)

It's total length is about 9" with a blade 4" long and about 1" wide.
Inscribe the hilt with the Runic transliteration of your "magickal name"
or with a more complex formula that better describes your creative, shaping
will. You can also refer to Numerological
Symbolism
for other ideas, and to help you formulate a proper inscription.


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Ritki (carver)

A special carver is often used to etch runes into all types of surfaces.

The ristir should be extremely pointed and sharp.
It is often the best tool to use for carving runes. If you
like you may inscribe your name or a magickal formula that
expresses the ritki's purpose into the handle of the carver.


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Coloring Tools

The Runes were traditionally colored with either red pigment or blood.
To the ancient Germans the verbal constructs "to make red" and "to endow
with magickal power" were synonymous. The German Zauber (magick) and
the Old Norse taufr (magick, talisman) both come from this concept. In
the technical terminology of ancient Rune craft the Proto-Germanic word fahido
and the Old Norse form literally mean "I color" and "to color," respectively.
These terms later came to mean "to fashion Runes" in general, describing the entire
complex process of carving, coloring, and consecrating the staves.


Pigments used by the ancient magicians were red ochre, minium (red lead), and madder.
Minium didn't come into use until more recently, but ocher has been used since Neolithic
times. Madder comes from the roots of the plant of the same name (rubia tincturia).
The Old Norse word for madder is madhrs, and the magickal power of the plant is
increased by magico-affective association of this world with madhr, the Old Norse
word for "man." All of these coloring agents are available in some form at art supply stores.
They should be ground up and mixed with linseed oil, or a gum mixture, in a ritual manner just
before beginning the Runic rite. Linseed comes from the seed of the flax plant, which is
extremely significant in Rune craft. Its ancient name lina appears a lot in Runic
talismans for fertility, growth, and well-being. While grinding the pigments the Runes
that you are going to use in the rite should be called upon to infuse the dye with their
energy. All of these colorants are symbolic substitutes for the innate magickal power
contained in blood, whether human or that of a ritually sacrificed animal. If blood is
used no infusion of energies is necessary. However, since the bloods Runes, the sanguine
mysteries, are part of the religious expression, many magicians will not use them. All of
the rituals I've set forth will be just as powerful using dyed Runes.

A special tool should be made for applying the pigments to the carved staves.
This can be fashioned from a piece of wood about as thin as a veneer, which is
cut into the shape of an isosceles triangle and inscribed with applicable Runes.
Kano is perfect for this tool.

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Magickal Space

Rune magick can be performed indoors or out, but for atmospheric reasons,
as well as to facilitate direct contact with the full power of the Rune
streams, outdoors is preferred.


Ideally, sacred rites would be performed in a holy grove of oak,
ash or yew trees located high on top of a hill. However, any secluded
spot in the woods will do. The actual workspace is spherical, and therefore
a round space should be cleared and ritually separated by performing the
opening ritual listed under Spells. Here we are mainly concerned with
the symbols to be used within this magickal space. The complexity of the symbology
used is up to the magician, you may keep it simple, if you prefer, there are no rules
regarding this. Generally, when the work is performed within an enclosed space, the
symbolism tends to be more complex, and most magicians use an altar, which may be either
round or rectangular, placed in either the north or the east, or even in the center of the circle.

Linguistic evidence shows that in the earliest of times Germans
performed magick while orientated in the east (according to linguistic
evidence) or in the north (as archeological evidence demonstrates). The
English word "evening" is derived from a Proto-Germanic root aftan-,
that meant "backward"; hence, it indicates the observer faced the east at twilight.
There is also a large amount of lore that speaks for northern orientation. The
Christian missionaries had trouble getting newly "converted" German pagans to
pray in the east instead of in the north, as was their heathen custom. The
Icelandic hof (temples) ere lined up on a north-south axis, and even in
the oldest times the passageways of the grave mounds faced northward It is likely
that both of these directions were considered powerful and that each was used depending
on the type of ritual being performed - east for matters concerning the earth and north
for matters concerning the "other worlds." Most modern Rune crafters prefer north for
the same reason that the missionaries hated it. Face whichever direction feels most right to you.

The altar itself will hold all of the objects needed for the ritual.
It will also be used as a "workbench" on which the Rune tines are carved.
In an outdoor ritual a rock or tree stump may be used, or you can make
a portable altar for such occasions.

As for the circle that you draw to define the sacred space,
it can be as simple as a circle drawn on the ground with your
wand, or you can draw glyphs on the flour of a (sacred
room) with chalk or other material. The circle should indicate the
eight divisions of heaven, that are symbolic representations of the
eight otherworlds in Norse cosmology, and the Runes should be placed in
the outer ring. Other figures can be added as the magician sees fit.


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Magickal Time

Properly timing Runic rites is very important, and while complex,
it is no more strict or complicated than traditions that use western astrology.


To fully explain why the following criteria are used would require
a large amount of study and serve only to confuse. The most important
things to take into consideration are: 1. the season; 2. the phase of the
moon; and 3. the position of the sun (the time of day). The best times are
dawn, midday, evening, and midnight. For increase of power the waxing moon is
used, and for constricting power the waning moon is preferred. The best time for
any ritual work is on the night of the new moon or just after, or during the
full moon or just before. Again, use your intuition as a guide in these matters. Keep
in mind that time and space are aspects of one another and both are measured by the
mjötvidhr {the measuring tree (Yggdrasill)}.


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Other Tools

Several rites call for additional instruments, and while the less
important will be include with the rites and spells in which they are
used, there are a few that are worth mentioning here.


The magician should have a drinking horn or goblet from which to drink mead.
The horn can either be a properly prepared natural one or one made out of
a precious metal; the goblet should be made of wood, clay, gold, or silver.
In either case, the Runes

should be ritually inscribed on it in the
talismanic manner.
These Runes are transcribed as ódhroerir and mean "the exciter of
inspiration." This is the name of the divine mead of inspiration and of the
vessel in which it is contained. The numerical and ideographic symbolism of this
formula is powerful. The Rune count is 7, and its total is 87, 3 s 29 (see Numerical Symbolism).

A fire-pot of some sort may also be needed in some rituals.
It can be made of either clay or metal. This fire symbolizes
the quickening power of Muspellsheimr. In addition, two pieces
of linen cloth - one black, one white - should be on hand. A leather
thong, symbolic of the containing, binding force in the multiverse is also commonly used.

The equipment of the Rune crafting magician (vitki) is distinguished by its mobility.
All of the major tools needed for magickal workings should be so well hidden that no one should
even notice their presence.


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Chart of Correspondences

No.
Elder Form
Elder Name
Anglo-Saxon Name
Tree
Herb
God/ Goddess/ Wight(s)
Color
Astrological Symbol
Tarot Card
1
Fehu
Feoh
elder
nettle
Æsir
light red
aries
Tower
2
Uruz
Ur
birch
sphagnum moss
Vanir
dark green
taurus
High Priestess
3
Thurisaz
Thorn
oak
houseleek
Thor
bright red
mars
Emporer
4
Ansuz
Ós
ash
fly agric
Ódin
dark blue
mercury
Death
5
Raido
Rád
oak
mugwort
Forseti
bright red
sagittarius
Heirophant
6
Kano
Cén
pine
cowslip
Freyja & dwarves
light red
venus
Chariot
7
Gebo
Gyfu
ash & elm
heartease
Ódin & Freyja
deep blue
pisces
Lovers
8
Wunjo
Wynn
ash
flax
Freyr & elves
yellow
leo
Stregth
9
Hagalaz
Hægl
yew or ash
lily of the valley
Ymir
light blue
aquarius
World
10
Nauthiz
Nyd
beech
bistort
Nornir & Etins
black
Capricorn
Devil
11
Isa
Ís
alder
henbane
rime-thurses
black
Crescent Moon
Hermit
12
Jera
Gér
oak
rosemary
Freyr
light blue
Spirit
Fool
13
Eihwaz
Éoh
yew
mandrake
Ódin & Ullr
dark blue
scorpio
Hanged Man
14
Perth
Peordh
beech
aconite
Nornir
black
Saturn
Wheel of Fortune
15
Algiz
Eolh
yew
angelica
Valkyrjur
gold
cancer
Moon
16
Sowelu
Sigil
juniper
mistletoe
Sol
white & silver
Sun
Sun
17
Teiwaz
Tír
oak
sage
Tyr & Máni
bright red
libra
Justice
18
Berkana
Beorc
birch
lady's mantle
Frigg, Nethus & Hel
dark green
virgo
Empress
19
Ehwaz
Eh
oak & ash
ragwort
Freyja/Freyr & Alcis
white
Gemini
Lovers
20
Mannaz
Mann
holly
madder
Heimdallr/ Ódin
deep red
Jupiter
Magician
21
Laguz or Laukaz
Lagu
willow
leek
Njöordhr & Baldr
deep green
Crescent Moon
Star
22
Inguz
Ing
apple
self-heal
Ing & Freyr
yellow
New
Moon
Judgement
23
Dagaz
Dæg
spruce
clary
Ódin & Ostara
light blue
Waning and
Waxing Moons
Temperance
24
Othila
Othila
hawthorn
goldthread
Ódin & Thor
deep yellow
Full
Moon
Moon


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All information in these pages comes from the following sources:


and The Book of Runes by Ralph H. Blum.

A now out of print and rare book and stones set.
It can still be bought, used, at the above link, though.


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