Artwork by Maxine Gadd



To look up a faery by its name, click on the first letter of that name.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T W V



Anthropophagi – An English faery whose name means “man-eating,” in Greek. They are described as being headless, their small brains being located near their genitals, with eyes on their shoulders, and a mouth in the center of their chest. It is because they have no nose that they can consume human flesh without gagging. In addition to eating humans, they use human bones to make tools and common household items for daily use. Though they are nasty little creatures, they do only kill when they’re hungry.

Top of page



Bocan – A hobgoblin from the Isle of Skye, also known in Ireland, North America, and Australia. They are known for being tricksters who are sometimes dangerous and sometimes helpful.

Top of page



Buggars – Shape shifting English goblins who DO NOT like humans.

Top of page



Chi Spirits – Chinese energy faeries that inhabit homes and are very benevolent toward humans. The art of Feng Shui is designed around making these spirits comfortable and allowing them to move as smoothly and freely as possible around your home.

Top of page



Dryads – Spirits of vegetation who inhabit trees and fields. They are very protective of their homes and all who dwell therein, especially the plant life. They’re most active during Esbats and are known to live in all of the 13 trees that are sacred to the Celts, though the willow is said to be their favorite. They are usually playful creatures who are rarely seen as more than enchanting wisps of pure light, and seem to welcome human contact. They are similar to the Greek nymphs called Drayads, female tree spirits, and male tree spirits known as Drus. Dryads, when in the mood to be helpful, as opposed to playful, can help one to learn the secrets of tree magick, divination, and astral travel. They are most easily found in groves of trees, especially those containing willow or other Druidic sacred trees, of course the Faery Triads of oak, ash, and thorn or rowan, birch and elder are good places to look as well. Invite them to your circle when invoking the spirits of the east, even if they don’t show, they may lend their energy to you, if they agree with your spell’s purpose. They may even help you in contacting gods and goddesses, if you ask properly. Also see Hamadryads and Hamadryadniks.

Top of page



Dirne-weibl – The German Wood wife who comes out of the woods and asks travelers to accompany her. If told no she will disappear, sadly weeping. She is usually seen wearing white, but in Bavaria she wears red and will give a basket of apples, that will turn into money, to anyone who fulfills her request.

Top of page



Hamadryads – Greek and Roman nymphs who live in and are a part of the trees they protect. From the waist up they are beautiful females and from the waist down they are the tree’s trunks and roots. If a hamadryad’s tree dies she dies with it, and if a mortal cuts it down, she will cry out as the first cut is made. Also see Dryads and Hamadryadniks.

Top of page



Hamadryadniks – Yugoslavian and Czechoslovakian tree spirits who exist as the tree’s foliage, and are malevolent toward humans. They can only leave their trees during the daytime; to do so at night would kill them, which is when they go about in search of food and protection for their homes. Although they hate humans for continuously destroying the forests, they have yet to find a way to harm us, however contact is still unadvisable. Also see Dryads and Hamadryads.

Top of page



Huldra – A malevolent wood nymph of Scandinavia. From the front she is very beautiful and alluring, from behind she is hollow and has the tail of a cow. Any man who is seduced by her is likely to lose his mind or be otherwise scarred for life.

Top of page



Muma Padura – A wood nymph of Slavic and Romanian folklore who is completely benevolent and kind towards humans. When a human child has gotten lost in her forest she will go in search of the child and return it safely to its parents.

Top of page



Dybbuk – A restless spirit of the Hebrew tradition who can’t rest because of some unforgiven sin and prowls in search of a human body to possess. It can be exorcised by a rabbi.

Top of page



Erlkonig – The Germanic goblin king of the dwarfs, also known as Erl King, Alder King, and Oak King. He haunts forests and woodlands, especially the Black Forest of Germany, where he lures children and travelers to their deaths.

Top of page



Fachan – Also known as Peg Leg Jack, this is one mean and ugly goblin. He is described as having one hand protruding from his chest, one leg from his haunch, one eye in the center of his head, one tuft of rough, spiky hair on top of his head, and a dark blue cape of twisted hard, thick feathers protecting his body. In his hand he carries an iron flail that has 20 chains hanging from it, with 50 iron-spiked balls on each chain, and poison on the tip of each spike. He is an evil creature who is a member of the fuaths and spends all of his time being angry with the gods for not giving him the ability to fly. He is a very solitary faery who only lives in the very highest of the Scottish Highland Mountains, and hates all living creatures with a passion. Stay away from this one!

Top of page



Fays – Also known as Fee, Fada, Fae, Fata, and Fas, these tiny winged beings hail from Albania. They are very playful and mischievous, but never harmful. They’re always active, but most especially during the changes of seasons. These beings come in four varieties – one for each season of the year. The Triple Goddess adores these tiny gardeners of the earth, and they help her to turn the Wheel of the Year, changing the seasons as it spins. You can find them all around in nature and in faeryland, and contacting them is as simple as requesting their presence. Like other playful faeries, they may not be of much help in anything serious, but you may be able to elicit their aid if you employ dancing to raise energy.

Top of page



Folletto – According to Edain McCoy’s A Witch’s Guide to Faery Folk, this is a race of Italian weather faeries also known as Sumascazzo, Grandinilli, and Salvanelli, in various regions throughout Italy. The Sicilian Salvanelli (wind knots) are said to dress in red and live in oak trees. She states that in other regions they are so tiny and faint that they are almost invisible, but do have one distinguishing characteristic that is known of – their toes point backwards. They tend to be active all year, changing weather patterns, especially whipping up windstorms, for their joy and amusement. They also enjoy a good hailstorm every now and again, and have even been said to be the cause of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. But their favorite element is air, so they usually leave destructive earth forces to other elementals. They have also been spotted riding on the backs of grasshoppers, playing a game similar to polo.

According to Carol Rose’s Spirits, Fairies, Gnomes, and Goblins: An Encyclopedia of the Little People, the Italian Folletto, known in France as Follet, Alp in Germany, and Duende in Spain, are an entirely different race of beings. In her book, the Folletto is a European medieval fiend of the night known in Latin as the Incubus, which means, “that which lies upon.” As its name implies, this is a malevolent spirit who mounts women while they are sleeping for the purpose of having intercourse with them and, often, impregnating them. They are said to be able to take on any form, male or female, but usually appear in the guise of a woman’s husband or lover, or are just completely invisible. They can be recognized by their stinking, sulphurous breath and cloven hooves, and can be guarded against with St. John’s Wort, Vervain, and dill, or with amuletic rings.

Whether or not you’d like to contact the Folletto is up to you, just be careful. The Folletto that Edain McCoy speaks of may be willing to assist you in weather magick, though they are inclined to ignore humans, but an Incubus would be nothing but trouble. If you do decide to seek them out for weather magick, perhaps it would be safer to use one of their other names, such as Sumascazzom, or Grandinilli – I haven’t found any information to contradict Edain’s views of them, however more on the Salvanelli follows.

Top of page



Salvanelli – According to Carol Rose, these beings are similar to Edain’s Folletto, but not entirely. Both authors agree that they dress in red and like to live in the cracks of an oak tree's bark, as well as in any other holes in trees. Where they differ is how these being should be classified and what their favorite activities are. Carol states that they are impish elves or wood spirits, as opposed to air elementals who, like the English pixies, like to ride horses in the stables all through the night, leaving them in a lather. She also says that the Salvanelli are given to stealing milk, if none is left out for them.

Top of page



Fylgiar – These Icelandic spirits of Norse mythology are the hereditary protective guardian faeries of individual humans from birth, passing on from ancestor to descendant. A sign that one has such a familiar is that one is born with a caul over ones head. The Fylgiar, whose name means “Follower,” can appear as a woman riding through the skies, bearing arms, or as an animal. Regardless of which form they take, they appear as tutelary spirits in dreams, giving warnings or advice about future events, and while intentionally making astral projections, when it is believed the person assists the familiar. To see one’s Fylgiar while awake is a portent of one’s own imminent death, the type of which can be determined by its appearance. If the faery is all chewed up and nasty it’s an indication of a disgustingly painful death; a peaceful faery indicates a calm, easy, painless departure. The familiar continues on after its human dies, accompanying the soul to the afterlife, where it remains until the human soul has comfortably accepted their demise, before moving on to its new charge.

Top of page



Gancanagh – see Geancanach.

Top of page



Gans – These are the faery folk of the Apache Indians of North America. They are considered to be neither good nor evil and are honored in special tribal dances and ceremonies. They represent the spirit of the mountains and the energies found therein. In their tribal dances honoring them, the Apaches wear black masks, white robes, and headdresses made of wood. They believe that whatever happens to them while they are in the mountains is a direct result of how well they performed their ritual.

The best time to contact the Gans is while you are in or near the mountains of the American Southwest. They may help you find shelter, protect you from danger, or help you connect with deities, or they may even help you change the weather. Be cautious though, because they may choose to make things worse, instead.

Top of page



Gitto – According to Edain McCoy’s A Witch’s Guide to Faery Folk, these Welsh creatures, also known as Griffith, Griffin, Gryphon, and Geetoe are said to have the head of a horse and the body of a goat, and to be wingless creatures capable of flying short distances. They are also said to possess human speech and laughter. They are at their most active during the fall harvest when they like to blight the crops, claiming any that are left standing after sundown on Samhain as their own. They have a very nasty disposition and despise humans, but they are incapable of inflicting physical harm upon us. Still, contact is best avoided.

In the Dictionary of World Folklore by Larousse, a griffin has the head and wings of an eagle, the body of a lion, and occasionally, the tail of a snake. In this form, the form of Gryphon that I am familiar with, common in the Mediterranean and the Near East, they are a symbol of power, valor, and nobility, and usually shown pulling the chariot of the sun or guarding their hoard of gold. In fact, in medieval Christian lore, the griffin was a symbol of Christ, himself, being a combination of human and divine natures and being, therefore, associated with kingship and resurrection.

Top of page



Glashtin – This Isle of Man weather spirit is also known as Hawlaa, Howlies, and Howlers, and is described as being half cow and half horse. If the goblin should appear with the head of a cow it is stupid; if the head is that of a horse it is shrewd and cunning. They are also said to always be invisible (good luck seeing its head ~_~ *lol*). The Glashtin appear during storms, when they can be heard laughing and playing, perhaps enjoying all the destruction the storm is causing, or perhaps just obliviously enjoying the ride. They also howl loudly just before a storm hits, giving fair warning to all who can hear them. The Manx believe them to be the cause of their frequent storms, though, by some accounts, they are considered to be guardian spirits, as well. They are most easily found playing in the sky during severe storms, perhaps that’s why contact is ill advised.

Top of page



Gremlin (aka Grimblens, Gremlers, Sky Bogies, Spandules (the ones who ice airplane wings), Fifenellas (the females), and Widgets (the children) – These diminutive mischievous imps first caught the attention of humans in World War I, but didn’t become widely known until World War II, when they began causing major problems for air force men. Gremlins live to cause tools and machinery to malfunction, especially at critical moments, and they are also known to steal socks out of clothes washers and dryers. They have been described as being tan to dark brown in color, completely covered in hair, and anywhere from 6” to 21” in height and, in spite of all havoc they reap with pilots, they are wingless and must hitch rides on the planes they mess with. Though this does explain why some bomb-damaged planes manage to buck the odds and return to home base.

Top of page



Guruiz – Italian weather elves said to be friendly towards farmers, they help give them the weather they need, from spring through to the end of harvest time.

Top of page



Hyters – Edain McCoy’s Hyters are English shape shifting faeries who assume the form of birds, favoring that of the buzzard or vulture. In her account they don’t particularly like humans, deriving joy from gathering in groups and buzzing them into a state of fear, but they have never hurt anyone. These beings are most easily encountered during the late afternoon and early evening, just before sunset, in Faeryland, though contact is advised against – just sit back and watch them fly.

According to two of my other sources, the full name of these beings is Hyter Spirits, and they are both grateful and helpful to humans who treat them with kindness, and stern critics of bad behavior. In their human form they are said to have sandy-colored skin and hair, and beautiful green eyes. They also like to shape shift into the form of sand martins, sandy-colored birds that nest in sand dunes. Both sources also state that these faeries hail from Lincolnshire and East Anglia, England, and that they have been known to find lost children and bring them home. Carol Rose, in Spirits, Fairies, Gnomes, an d Goblins: An Encyclopedia of the Little People, is the only one who says that Hyter Spirits assume the shape of anything other than birds, believing them to have many forms to chose from.

Top of page



Incubus – see Succubus and Carol Rose’s version of the Folletto.

Top of page



Jinn – “It is said of the beings created by Allah that the angels were formed from light, the Shaitans from the fire of His anger, the humans from the earth, and the Djinns from the Saharan wind (the Simoon),” Carol Rose in Spirits, Fairies, Gnomes, an d Goblins: An Encyclopedia of the Little People.

Arabian Jinns may be invisible or appear in any shape, real or fictitious, beautiful or grotesque, that they desire. When a jinn appears as a beautiful woman, the deception can be detected by noticing her vertical eyes and goat or camel hooves. However, by the time one is close enough to notice these deformities, it’s usually too late to save them. Jinns can be either benevolent or purely evil, but even those who perform acts of kindness shouldn’t be trusted. They are most easily found in the desert, in isolated ruins, or on remote islands where they may live alone or in communities of mischief-makers. Although, if you’re lucky, you may be able to find one imprisoned in a lamp or a bottle, as well. If you should happen upon one of these containers the Jinn would appear at your summoning, bowing to its new master, and grant you anything you wish.

Some Jinn have fallen in love with humans and produced children from these unions. Their offspring are able to walk through walls and fly, and they age very slowly. To those that they like, or to magicians that control them, Jinns can bring great wealth, beauty, and wondrous possessions. To those they dislike or have been sent to harm, they bring disasters, nightmarish tortures, and horrifying deaths. Those Jinns known as Afrit, Afreet, Efreet, Efrit, Ifreet, and Ifrit are said to be the second most powerful of the five classes of these demons. Not only are they huge, they are incredibly mean, inspiring great fear. They are especially good at shape shifting and live to affect the downfall of humans.

Moroccans believe that everyone has their own personal Jinn throughout their life called Grines. They also believe in the existence of independent Jinns that live in dark and isolated places. The earth Jinns are said to inhabit drains, bathhouses, cleaning places, cemeteries, and ruins. These Jinns are easily offended so specific procedures must be followed before one digs a hole for drainage or to build a foundation, else incite their ire. Water jinns live near rivers, fountains, and wells, and derive great joy from luring humans into these bodies of water to kill them. The tree Jinns, such as the Hamadryads, are usually kind to humans, letting them rest in the shade of their leaves – all except for those of the fig tree whose jinn likes to make people argue.

In Egypt whirlwinds of sand and dust devils in the desert are said to be the signs of where an evil Jinn is traveling. One must protect themselves from them because they are likely to throw stones at people from rooftops and steal any good food or beautiful women that strike their fancy. Invoking Allah will get rid of them, and shooting stars over the desert are said to be arrows that Allah is firing at them.

In Serbia and Albania Jinns are considered to be evil spirits of nature that live in the mountains, lakes, and forests, where they are said to terrify and mislead travelers who disrespect the areas that they control.

According to Eliphas Levi, Jinn is the name of the emperor, or the Salamander elementals, spelled Djin.

Top of page



Lady of the Lake – In Cornwall and Wales she is the lady who resides on the Isle of Avalon, a magnificent and wealthy faery kingdom hidden in the depths of Dosmary Pool. She is a true lake maiden, the queen of her isle of maidens is in the middle of an enchanted lake, where winter never comes and no one knows sorrow. It is in her castle there that she raises Lancelot to be the champion protector of her cowardly son, Mabuz the Enchanter. It is she, Nimue, who gives the legendary sword Excalibur to Arthur, and she to whom it is returned when Arthur is mortally wounded by his half-brother, Mordred. At the returning of the sword the Lady of the Lake and three other faery queens fetch Arthur and take him, by boat, to Avalon and immortality.

There are other Ladies of the Lake, as well. One is the benevolent faery creature who inhabits Orchardleigh in Somerset, England; another is the Lady of Little Van Lake, a Welsh faery known for her magick herbal healing. There is a malevolent Lady of the Lake residing in Traunsee in Austria who is said to be very beautiful, with long flowing hair. She can be seen in the lake at moonrise, or by the waterfall on moonlit nights, riding upon a water-horse that looks as if it has just been whipped. To see her is a bad omen; she will chase down any human and fishermen have been said to vanish from the shores of the lake without a trace.

Top of page



Leanansidhe – Though Edain McCoy states that there is only one of this being; my research has uncovered another, the Lhiannon-shee of the Isle of Man. Ireland’s Leanansidhe is a female faery being who desires the love of mortal men. A beautiful vampire faery, she gives her lovers poetic and musical inspiration while she gradually syphons off their life force until they die. Rather than drink their blood, however, she stores it in a huge red cauldron that is said to be the source of her beauty and her powers.

The Manx Lhiannon-shee, while very similar, has two distinct differences: 1. She haunts wells and springs, and 2. She attaches herself to a single man, who sees her as being incredibly beautiful while remaining invisible to everyone else; if he succumbs to her seduction she will drain him body and soul, like a vampire, sans inspiration.

Top of page



Lesidhe (aka Leshy) – Irish nature spirits who, disguised as foliage, are the guardians of forests, and all that inhabit them. In Russia they appear as humans with oddly pale complexions, green eyes, a green beard, and long green straggly hair. They also wear their boots on the wrong feet and don’t cast a shadow. In Ireland they are said to appear as sexless creatures and, though usually found in groups, seem to basically keep to themselves. In Russia, except in very large forests, each Leshy has his own woodlands to protect.

They are most active at dawn and dusk throughout the spring and summer. Though they are active all day and night they tend to favor the night. The masters of shape shifting, Lesidhe can transform themselves into any plant or animal, of any shape or size, and make any sound of the forest. They are said to use this talent to mischievously lead travelers astray, disliking humans for the way they’ve treated the environment, though they’ve never harmed anyone.

The Russians believe that each Leshy has a wife, Lesovikha, and children, Leshonki. The Lesovikha, the female of these forest spirits, can appear in the form of a beautiful naked girl, a hag with a large full bosom, or a wraith dressed in flowing white gossamer. If one should encounter a Lesovikha while she is giving birth, and cover the Leshonki without a prayer or sign of the cross, and leave, the spirit will follow that one. The spirit would then have to ask the person which they desired most, money or a happy life. If the human chooses money, the reward will be instant, and turn to ashes upon his leaving the forest. If the person wishes for nothing, then good fortune will always be theirs.

Be careful, should you ever decide to call upon these beings, for not much is known about them, and in Slavic lore the Leshy are said to enjoy luring beautiful young women into the forest to rape them. To find them on either the mundane or astral planes, go to a wild wood or forest and quietly watch, wait, and listen until you can sense its movement around you, you may even see the foliage move in an odd, human-like way. It may be possible to get them to help you in magick intended to help the planet and the environment.

Top of page



Lob – A friendly rustic faery who likes to inhabit the homes of humans and help them with their household chores, much like a brownie, they’re also known as Hobs. One well-known Lob is called Lob-Lie-by-the-Fire. He is a friendly giant of a brownie, if not a tad lazier than his nocturnal cousins. He was a mischievous character, but would help with the farm work. This poem by John Milton describes him well:

With stories told of many a feat,
How Faery Mab the junkets eat,
She was pnkcht, and pulled she sed,
And he by Friars Lanthorn led
Tells how the drudging Goblin swet,
To ern his Crema-bowlie duly set,
When in one night, ere glimpse of morn,
His shadowy Flale hath thresh’d the Corn
That ten day-labourers could not end,
Then lies him down at the Lubbar Fend,
And stretch’d out all the chimney’s length,
Basks at the fire his hairy strength;
And crop-full out of dores he flings,
Ere the first Cock his Matlin brings.

Top of page



Lumansidhe – The Irish guardian spirits of the blackthorn bush, a faery tree used by humans and leprecauns for making walking sticks, also known as shillelaghs. The most dangerous times to cut a stick of blackthorn are during Samhain (originally celebrated on November 11th) and during the Esbats, when they leave the trees to worship the Moon Goddess. Their name translates to mean, “moon faery” and they are described as being small, thin, and bold wizened old men with pointed ears, long teeth, long arms, and long fingers. Though they live in groups, they aren’t trooping faeries, and they are said to despise humans, so approach blackthorn trees cautiously.

Top of page



Lutins – These are mischievous elves who live on farms in Normandy and France and enjoy hanging out and playing with human children. They are usually invisible, but the signs of their mischief are all too visible. Their favorite pastime is riding horses around the stables all night, working them into a lather and tangling their manes and tails. They also enjoy shape shifting into the form of a horse and tossing humans that are foolish enough to mount them, into ditches and bogs. It is then that they are called Cheval Bayard. They are actually highly adept at shape shifting, capable of taking on the form of both animals and inanimate objects, though they never transform into a human. They tend to inhabit people’s homes and trees along bodies of water, but they move around a lot. Another of their favorite games is transforming themselves into a nugget of gold and watching humans try to catch them. They move from place to place with a little flash of light, giving them the brief appearance of fireflies. Though they’re usually harmless their moods change so drastically, from good to bad, that they may, unintentionally, cause one physical or psychic harm through prolonged interaction.

Top of page



Mazikeen – In the Middle East these are a group of faeries whose sole purpose for existence is to steal food and drink to supply their perpetual party. They have wings, but don’t fly, and they never sleep, nor are they of any help to humans – they never stop partying. According to Jewish mythology, these beings are shape shifting demons who can take on any shape to taunt humans, and to create chaos and mischief.

Top of page



Moss Maidens – These are the wood nymphs or elves who inhabit and protect the trees in German forests. They are also referred to as Drayads, Moss Folk, Moss Women, Forest Folk, Wild Folk, Wood Folk, and Wood Wives. They are described as tiny little people who resemble wizened human females. Their bodies and faces are said to be entirely covered by the mosses that they weave to cover their trees roots. Their hair is made up of long strands of the gray lichens that grow on the trees’ branches, and their bare limbs, hands, and feet look like the gnarled roots of maple trees. They are generally friendly toward humans and might help you with herbal remedies to cure illness, but will punish those who break or harm saplings. Their main enemy is the Wild Huntsman who hunts them through the forest on stormy nights. In Voightland he is believed to be one of the Moss Folk.

Top of page



Moss People – These graceful and beautiful faeries resemble humans and are both male and female with large butterfly wings attached to their agile and supple bodies. Hence their other names of Monarchs of the Forest, Butterfly Faeries, and Flying Leaves. They are very shy of humans so they tend to hide in moss and in areas of dense foliage, making them hard to find in the wild. They are given to changes of interest and attitude according to their whims and passing fancies, but are good luck to have around. They are most easily contacted in dense woodlands during the summer. Perhaps by offering them fresh milk and making friendly conversation with them, you can draw them to you. They’ve never been known to assist in any magickal doing, but if they come to trust you anything is possible.

Some folks get the Moss People mixed up with Greenies, but they are different. Greenies are Lancashire faeries who dress in green and wear red caps on their heads, and they only reside in Faeryland. Not much else is known about them except that, like most of the Little People, they are vengeful when offended.

Top of page



Napaeae – A group of nymphs who are the guardian spirits of forests and groves.

Top of page



Orculli (aka Norrgens, in the Swiss Alps) – These are malevolent bearded male giants who like to eat their own kind. They live on the clouds, coming down to earth only when they are hungry. Though they are cannibals, they’ll eat beef and humans, if they have to. Their touch can fatally infect cattle and they are expert thieves. One can always tell when an Orculli is around because they smell like rotting flesh. Though enormous in size, they are slow and clumsy and, therefore, easily gotten away from, they are also deathly afraid of cats.

The Swiss Norrgens prefer to eat human and faery children to their own kind.

Top of page



Phookas (aka Kornbockers and Bwca) – A shape shifting hobgoblin of Ireland. In their natural state they have the head of a human male and the body of a horse, a goat (in Scandinavia), or a pig (Welsh Bwca). They can fly for short distances even though they don’t have any wings, and they are a group of trooping faeries who travel in packs.

Two out of my five sources say that these are malevolent ugly little creatures who can often be heard fighting amongst themselves and who derive great pleasure from harming children and stealing newborn babies. They also enjoy destroying any crops that haven’t been harvested by the night of November 1st, especially blackberries. Potatoes are one thing that they will steal, by night, at any time thoughout the year, because they love to eat them. According to Irish folk legend, potatoes that are harvested after sunset taste the best and never go bad, one would have to risk running into a Phooka to find out though.

All five sources agree that these fellas are most active from Beltaine (May 1st) through Samhain, and that they are hardly ever seen at any other time of the year.

Three of my sources say that Phookas are not all bad, and a fourth (Dictionary of World Folklore by Larousse) states that they are usually benevolent and harmless beings who only punish criminals, especially grave robbers and horse thieves. In their friendly mood they help people with household tasks and farming, and reward those who please them with the gift of animal speech. They have even been known to protect innocent peasants, and, if consulted on Samhain, give prophetic answers to the querents.

My conclusion: They are like most faeries in that they like those who are kind to them and exact revenge upon those who are not. Approach with caution, I could be wrong.

Top of page



Bwca – see Bucca.

Top of page



Kornbockers – These German and Scandinavian field spirits appear as either male deer (Germany) or as goats (Scandinavia) with the heads of human males. They can also take on the form of the blue cornflower that grows among stalks of corn. Their name literally means “Corn Buck,” and they guard wheat and corn in the fields, helping to ensure that it ripens and provides a good harvest.

Top of page



Pillywiggins – Tiny little springtime faeries who are charged with tending to the wildflowers that grow at the base of oak trees, such as the bluebell, cowslip, foxglove, and wild thyme. They are winged beings who resemble Pixies, are most active during the spring and early summer, and are very playful. They are a class of trooping faeries who neither dislike humans nor seem very interested in them, and are not known to be pranksters, either. They are simply the attendants of the God and Goddess of Spring and enjoy riding on the backs of honeybees from one flower to another.

Their queen is named Ariel, a beautiful, seductive, longhaired blonde who wears a gown of flowing white gossamer. Her preferred mode of transportation is riding on the back of a bat. She likes to sleep in beds of cowslips, has the power to control the wind, and communicates only with song. These fair and wee folk are most easily found among the wild flowers they so love, and in the land of Fae.

Top of page



Pixies – Small faeries who live above ground around hills, stone circles, groves of trees, and rivers, and underground in ancient mounds and caves from which they emerge to party in woods and glades during the night. Their appearance and demeanor are as varied as their titles of Grigs and Dusters (in east Anglia, England), Piskies (in Cornwall), Pechs and Pechts (in the Scottish Highlands), Pigsies, Pisgies, Pickers and Pixies (in Somerset and Devon). The one common trait they all share is that of leaving footprints of silver and gold pixy dust wherever they tread.

Pixies are described as small, pale, and youthful with red hair, short faces, pointed up turned noses, pointy ears, arched eyebrows, and shiny translucent wings. They are usually dressed all in green, except for their floral caps, and tend to squint a lot. One of my sources says their clothing changes to match the color of the season’s flora. This same source (Edain McCoy’s A Witch’s Guide to Fairy Folk) says that their hats are only made of the tops of foxgloves or toadstools, which they consider to be sacred, and that they appear to be androgynous. All of my sources say that Pixies are playfully mischievous and enjoy helping those humans that are kind to them and feed them fresh cream. They don’t like lazy people, though, and like to nip, pinch, trip and scare them (by knocking on walls, invisibly moving objects, and blowing out candles) into action.

If one should stumble upon these little ones whooping it up in the night, in their faery ring homes, one may approach them, cautiously, of course. Just remember, if you put both feet into the ring you will be trapped, unless you place a piece of iron on the edge of the ring, forcing it to remain open until you can get back out. Putting only one foot in the ring will allow you to watch the festivities and still escape, unless you are a criminal, in which case, whether you put one or both feet into the ring, you will be hanged.

Pixies have, on rare occasions, been known to be malevolent, but not injuriously so. During these bad moods they cheer themselves up by misleading humans who are traveling at night. Those who accidentally fall prey to this prank can break the enchantment known as being “pixy-led” by turning their coat inside out. Carrying a cross amulet or a piece of bread will prevent one from being pixy-led in the first place. Another of their devilish pastimes is “borrowing” horses and riding them around in gallitraps (faery rings) through the night and returning them to their stables to be found in a lathering, knotted mess, in the morning. As with most faeries, it’s not wise to offend them.

You can try calling them to you, if you’d like, but they won’t come – you have to go to them. Look for them in patches of wild flowers, faery rings, flower gardens, and the spring of Faeryland. Approach them with caution, letting them know you wish to become friends. But, don’t be surprised if they respond by playing harmless tricks on you – it just means that they like you.

Top of page



Grigs and Dusters – These little folk of Somerset, England are described as being happy little dwarfs who dress in green clothing and red stocking caps. The local folk leave them the Griggling apples, the smallest apples in the grove, at the end of each harvest.

Top of page



Pechs and Pechts – These Little People of the Scottish Highlands are said to be awesome castle builders, credited with the construction of many of the country’s ancient castles and churches. Being only 3 or 4 feet tall, with red hair, long arms, and feet large enough to keep them dry in the rain, they form a long chain from the quarry to the building site, pass the stones from hand to hand, and erect the entire structure in the course of one night. They can’t stand daylight and always return to their homes, called brughs and sitheans, at sunrise.

Top of page



Piskies – These household spirits of Cornwall, England resemble the brownie in their willingness to do work around homes and on farms, but are very capricious and more given to playing pranks than to working. They can be made to leave, in the same manner as a brownie, with a gift of new clothes. Like the Pixies, they enjoy riding horses into a lather and misleading human travelers. Unlike other Pixies, though, they are described as being little wizened old men. They are usually good to have around and said to bring exceptional good fortune to those they befriend.

Top of page



Poleviks – This Russian and Slavic nature spirit is a dwarf who inhabits fields of flax, straw, and grass, which they also grow for hair. They are said to have eyes of many colors and skin the color of earth (a deep dark black-brown), and dress all in white. They are called Polevoi in Slavic lore, and are rarely seen because they’re never taller than the crops in the fields, adjusting their height as needed. Though usually benevolent, kept so with gifts of eggs or baby roosters left along the edge of the field, they will punish those who are lazy. Any worker who falls into a drunken sleep while in the field is likely to be strangled.

In Poland they are described as two-legged goats who, as in Russia, aid in the growing and harvesting of crops. In exchange for their help they expect a payment of grain, a weekly libation also insures a good harvest and earns their favor.

These folk are most active from the beginning of spring until the end of autumn and are attracted to blue cornflowers. If you suspect that a Polevik is about propitiate it with offerings of grain or eggs, and hang a sickle over your door as protection from these little troublemakers. Otherwise, attempting to contact them is not a good idea.

Top of page



Rubezahl – These malicious dwarfs of Germany and Eastern Europe have many names, such as Number nip (in England), Hey-Hey Man, He-Manner, Ropenkerl, Huamann, Schlocherl, and Ruibheyzahl. They are an unpredictable guardian spirit of forests and mountains who dress in large black cloaks, the hoods of which hide their faces, and carry thin walking sticks that have spikes. They aren’t able to inflict physical harm on humans, and tend just to ignore those who are innocent, but they do enjoy leading travelers astray by yelling confusing noises. They are also said to be able to control the weather, summoning sudden wind or rain storms to confuse humans who damage their domain, or by summoning the sweltering hot sun to drive them away. They may be useful in magick performed to protect forests and mountains, but one should use extreme caution in one’s approach, contact probably isn’t worth the risk.

Top of page



Santa Claus – This jolly old spirit was, at one time, simply known as Saturn, the old man who lives at the North Pole, and gives a sprig of evergreen (the Christmas tree) to human children, along with the gift of a new year, every winter. The Scandinavian Sinter Klaas grew from the mythological Odin who would ride the winter skies doling out punishments to the wicked and rewards to the good. To the Dutch he is known as Sante Klaas, the Germans call him Kriss Kringle, to the English he is Father Christmas, to Russians, Father Frost, the French call him Pere Noel (who has a sidekick named Pere Fouttard), and to pagans he is the Holly King, ruling over the waning part of the year. The Christian figure of Santa Clause is derived from St. Nicholas, a bishop of Myra in the 4th century renowned for his generosity and kindness. Santa is no longer garbed in a monk’s robes, but in bright red garments trimmed in white fur from the arctic, black boots, and a wide black belt with a large gold buckle. He lives in a cavern of icicles that sparkle like diamonds, at the North Pole, with his wife, a crew of industrious eleven assistants, and a herd of magickal reindeer that can fly, and pull his equally magickal sleigh through the winter skies on the night of December 24th, Christmas Eve, each year. In England he is propitiated with a mince pie and a glass of alcohol, in America with milk and cookies. These libations are left near the hearth of the chimney that he uses to enter the house, where he, then, leaves gifts for all good little boys and girls, and lumps of coal for those who were bad.

Top of page



Father Christmas – This English spirit of rejuvenation can be traced back to the winter Feast of Fools, originating in the Roman Saturnalia. He is now the embodiment of joy and hope for the renewal of the sun and the promises of spring. He may also have been a part of Druidic ceremonies in pre-Roman Britain, having inherited Odin’s white hair and long white beard, traveling on either a goat or a donkey, giving gifts to the midwinter celebrants. In rural England he presides over the Mummer’s plays during the 12 days of Christmas, a tradition begun in the fourteenth century.

Top of page



Kriss Kringle – this spirit’s name is derived from Christkindl, which means “Christ-child.” In early Germanic and Austrian celebrations it was the Christ-child himself who was said to bring gifts to good children on Christmas Eve. At that time he was not impersonated by an adult who toured the village asking good children what they want, as he is now.

Top of page



Pere Noel – This is the French winter spirit who delivers gifts to children on Christmas Eve. He dresses in red and rides a white horse.

Top of page



Pere Fouttard – The Christmas spirit who partners with Pere Noel, his name means “Father Spanker.” He seeks out and punishes naughty children on Christmas Eve.

Top of page



Sinter Klaas – This Dutch spirit of moral benevolence dresses like a bishop and spends his summers in Spain (where he was once the ruler of the colonies of the Low Country). There, with his Moorish assistant, Swart Piet, he records children’s good and bad deeds. Each November these two sail to Amsterdam in a galleon loaded with toys. Once in port, Sinter Klaas then mounts a white horse, as Odin did, and delivers gifts to those children who were good and the means for the bad ones to be punished.

Top of page



The Holly King (King of the Waning Year) – This one-of-a-kind faery is a portly one, as symbol of abundance, and is dressed in either a red or green winter suit (depending on his mood) with a sprig of holly in his cap. He is a happy, smiling, benevolent spirit who is especially fond of children.

He wakes up and starts getting busy in midsummer (Litha) and keeps going until Yule when he passes the reign to the Oak King. In Europe and America, he is symbolized by the wren, a type of songbird. Deer are sacred to him, and the elves are his attendants.

He can most easily be found residing in Faeryland, and during the midsummer and Yule Sabbats. Call to him with the same reverence you would show for a god, during the waning of the year, for help in spiritual quests and magick involving children. A lot of covens even enact the struggle between him and the Oak King during Litha and Yule celebrations.

Top of page



Silvani – Winged wood nymphs of Italy and Greece who are almost ghost-like in their appearance and dress in red clothing and animal skins, preferring the skin of goats. They are of no known use to humans, though they don’t dislike us either, and inhabit the Italian Alps and Faeryland. If you’d like to try contacting them, you should know that they are very attracted to anything that is red, but that’s all that is known about them at this time. Good luck.

Top of page



Spriggans – The small, hideous, squat bodyguards of the Unseelie Court. These nasty little flying shape shifters reside in ancient forts (cromlechs), Cairns, and houses in remote urban areas. They get their jollies by replacing human babies with changelings, stealing valuables, and destroying crops. On the ground they can appear to be sharp rocks, but can become enormous, terrifying creatures by sucking in air, but they don’t usually physically harm humans. They are especially cruel to human misers, though they are very greedy themselves. They are most active at night, but you would be wise to steer clear of these guys – they’re nothing but bad news!

Top of page



Spunkies – Invisible Scottish faeries who can choose to apparate as short, ugly, long-armed, malignant goblins. Their man sources of entertainment are replacing human babies with changelings and leading unsuspecting travelers to their deaths. Contact is definitely not advised, especially since they are thought to have only existed as projected fear-forms and may now be extinct.

Top of page



Succubus and Incubus – A group of nasty little spirits, who originate from the Middle East, India, and the Orient. These creatures are active year-round, but only attack on rare occasions. The Succubus is the female of this race of fae who see humans as existing solely for their own perverse amusement. Succubae rape men, usually in the semblance of their wives or lovers (or while invisible) and Incubi rape women, likewise disguised as their mates, to propagate their species. People who have been attacked by these malevolent beings are usually marked with severe bruises and bite marks in strange and hard to reach places. Women have even had torn vaginal tissue after such an attack. Merlin is said to be the child of an Incubus who raped a human woman. They can be guarded against by placing a peony or cauldron in the bedroom of a female, or bluebells and a phallic symbol in a man’s bedroom. Do Not seek them out!

Top of page



Sylphs – Very small winged spirits of Greece and Egypt; the air elementals of Ceremonial Magick, also known as Windsingers. Their features resemble those of humans, thought they are said to be taller ant stronger than we are, and so light in color and body that they are almost transparent. Their emperor is named Paralda and they lend very powerful energy to any magickal working, automatically appearing in your circle when you call upon the east and air.

Top of page



Tengu – These spirits of the Japanese Shinto traditions are described as having the wings and beaks of birds, and usually carry a fan made of feathers. They wear clothing and live in communities among the trees in the forests and mountains. They have great magickal powers and are master shape shifters, preferring animal forms, and are not exactly malicious, but are known to be tricksters. They don’t seem to really want to have anything to do with humans, choosing to ignore all attempts at contact but, you can try if you’d like.

Top of page



TrowsTrolls of the Orkney and Shetland Islands, the United Kingdome, of which there are three different types. The Land Trows, aka the “guid folk” or “guid neighbors,” inhabit ancient earth mounds, cromlechs, and caves, the interiors of which are decked with gold and precious gems. These short, round, misshapen faeries have no legs. They are usually dressed in gray, and are skilled metalworkers and healers who bring good luck to any family that they choose to befriend.

A subgroup of the Land Trows is the Peerie Trows. These extremely tiny faeries dress all in green and live under toadstools. They, too, like humans, but are a tad more mischievous than their gray-clad cousins. Just for fun, they like to sneak around at night and rearrange things, like furniture, just to aggravate humans. They also love to make music and dance in the moonlight in magick rings. They travel by flying through the air on bulrushes.

The Kunal Trows are a melancholy group whose men, though they are both male and female, have been known to take human wives. The wives die when they give birth to the offspring produced from these unions, whether human or Trow, and the males die when their sons have grown. One Kunal Trow, who lived for hundreds of years as a bachelor, was eventually seduced by and married a sorceress. Their children were the spirits Finis, the being who appears before death, impersonating the dying human, and Ganfer, a spirit who is always waiting to possess some unsuspecting human and ally itself to the physical realm.

The third group is the Sea Trows who inhabit caverns deep in the sea. They sometimes appear on land in the form of an aquatic creature, such as a mermaid or merman, or a Haaf Fish (Gray Seal). Before venturing onto dry land they must remove their one aquatic “skin,” and any human who finds the skin can have the merperson as their spouse. However, if the trow should find their skin they will take it and return to the sea.

All Trows have certain traits in common. They all abduct humans, especially mothers and babies, the mothers as nursemaids to their own young, and the babies so they can unload a changeling. They also kidnap human fiddlers and pipers, who rest near their homes, to make music for them. Some musicians credit their good fortune and skill of composing music to having played for the Trows.

The Trows may be of some help in magickal workings, especially the Land Trows.

Top of page



Well Spirits – These guardians of wells are found in Ireland, England, and Norway, but it is the Irish pagans who use sacred wells as magickal locations. Well spirits are very sympathetic to human needs, but they exact a large toll for their assistance. They are master shape shifters who prefer taking on the form of dangerously gorgeous humans. They live one to a well, and it is to that spirit you make your appeal when you drop a coin in a wishing well. However, should you allow one of these beings to hug you, you could end up being dragged into the well to spend eternity as his or her consort, which is often the price of their assistance. Though they are all dangerous, approaching them in a respectful manner while donning protective charms should keep you safe, should you decide you’d like to contact one. The best places to find them are at wells and hot springs. USE EXTREME CAUTION!

Top of page



Wood Wives – These tiny elf maidens live in the woods of both Scandinavia and Germany where they are also called Dirne-weibl, Elle Folk, Fizz-weibl, Holy-frau, Spae-wives, and Wish Wives, and are believed to be the quarry of the Wild Hunt. They are said to be very pretty and have long blond hair, clothed in a dress that has a green bodice, a blue skirt, and a red vest. When loud noises and steam come out of the rocks during the summer it is believed that they are washing their clothes. Should you happen to see a Wood Wife in her home she may ask you to mend something for her, or to borrow something from you. It would behoove you to help her for, although she will pay you in wood chips, they will turn to gold coins when you leave the forest. As with Dryads and Hamadryads, their existence is said to be one with that of their trees. For each tree that is destroyed a Wood Wife dies as well.

Top of page



Vrikshakas – The benevolent tree nymphs in the mythology of India. Like the Dryads they are the guardian spirits of woodlands and trees and are described as emerging from the trunks of trees in the form of voluptuous women. They and the Apsaras are the attendants of Indra.

Top of page


















Lisa's Planet Hafapea's Universe



To Purchase Fairy Garden: Fairies of the Four Seasons
For books by Laurie Cabot, click here.
To Purchase Edain McCoy's A Witch's Guide to Faery Folk
Buy Brian Froud's Faeries & Good Faeries, Bad Faeries Here
Click here for Scott Cunningham's The Complete Book of Incense, Oils & Brews

If you can't find the books through the above links, they should have them here.